Material From My Talk at Tulsa Tech Fest 2013

Tulsa Tech Fest 2013 was fun. I’d like to thank everybody who showed up for my sessions.

Here’s a link to my “Adventures of a .NET developer in Rails land” presentation.

It seems like my “Software Development is a Joke!” closing keynote was overall a great success. Since I’ve now presented that session twice so far, I’ll be writing a separate post to talk about my experiences there.  Smile

Leave a comment

Material from my presentations at HTF 2013

I’d like to thank everybody who shows up for my presentations at Houston Tech Fest 2013, as well as the organizers for letting me speak there.  Smile

Here’s a link to my “Want to Build Software? Get Your Act Together First!”  talk. This talk has been recorded on video. I’ll let you know when it’s available online.

As for my other talk  (“Software Development is a Joke!”), it has also be recorded, but since I’ll be presenting it at Tulsa Tech Fest 2013 next week, I don’t want it out so we don’t spoil the fun for the attendees there. Smile Also, I’m going over the material and streamlining it in order to improve it.

1 Comment

Houston Tech Fest 2013 is Upon Us!

Houston Tech Fest is upon us! It happens this weekend, Saturday the 28th, and I have a surprise for you: I’ll also be doing my “Software Development is a Joke!” session there. Check out the conference’s agenda to see where and what time my sessions are going to be, and make sure to stop by and say hi.  Smile
Want to build software? Get your act together first!

Software developers are supposed to create applications that make people’s life easier, automating tedious tasks, encouraging users to get their work done, organizing complex workflows into digestible information and actions, helping them separate the most important information from the least important. But still, most developers forget to automate their own boring tasks. We forget to organize our information. We sometimes use tools that do not help us get our work done.

So how can we build software that fits our client needs, if we don’t understand those needs ourselves?

This session is NOT about software development; this session is about things we can do and tools we can use to organize ourselves, so we can free up our minds to more important things. Tools covered in this session include (but not limited to) Evernote, application launchers, screen capture tools, tablets, smartphones, etc.

 

Software Development is a Joke!

Several of my technical presentations introduce some kind of humor, but sometimes people end up learning the joke and not the concept. So I decided to do a humor presentation based on software development, introduce some technical stuff, and see what I get!

After so many years writing software, I can’t help but laugh at so many (good and bad!) experiences myself and other developers have had. Not to mention things that just can’t make sense to normal people: how can this ?[A-Z0–9._%+-]+@[A-Z0–9.-]+.[A-Z]{2,4}$ be called a “regular” expression? (If you know by heart what that expression means, you are probably the kind of people who will try to explain to me why zero-based arrays are kinda cool… please, just don’t!).

F-bombs may be dropped, but let’s be honest, you drop them yourself when it’s 5pm on Friday and that code insists not to work, don’t you?

Leave a comment

Using Evernote to Manage a Gifts and Crafts Shop on Etsy

Back in 2011 I wrote a post on how I was using Evernote, which is the 2nd most popular post on my blog currently. I guess it was about time for me to write another one, as I continue to use Evernote a lot! Actually, instead of writing another long post, I’ll probably write a couple of short ones…

A few months ago my wife started to produce some great handmade gifts and I wanted an easy way for her to publish, as well as to organize her business. I found out Etsy was a great platform for publishing her items, so we opened her online store called CLVL Arts Brazil, and we are using Evernote to organize her business. It’s worth mentioning she had no idea what Evernote was, but once I showed her how I use it, she started to use it too, and even got a better phone that runs the mobile app more smoothly. As I teach her how to use Evernote and other tools in this business, I plan on writing a series of posts describing our experiences, hoping this will be helpful to somebody else.

I’ll keep updating this one blog post with all the posts in these series, and will also use tags such as “CLVL Arts Brazil”, “Evernote”, etc., so we can find everything around more easily. 

More to come! Meanwhile, you may want to check out our store at http://www.etsy.com/shop/CLVLArtsBrazil.

CLVL Arts Brazil

,

Leave a comment

Upcoming Speaking Engagements

I’ve taken a break from doing presentations in the last two years or so, and a lot of people have been asking me when I’d come out and develiver a talk again. Time has come! :)

I’ll be speaking at the Houston Tech Fest on September 28, and also at the Tulsa Tech Fest on October 11. I’m looking forward to both conferences, as I’ve had a great time presenting at both in the past.

Here are the talks I’ll be doing…

Houston Tech Fest

Want to build software? Get your act together first!

Software developers are supposed to create applications that make people’s life easier, automating tedious tasks, encouraging users to get their work done, organizing complex workflows into digestible information and actions, helping them separate the most important information from the least important. But still, most developers forget to automate their own boring tasks. We forget to organize our information. We sometimes use tools that do not help us get our work done.

So how can we build software that fits our client needs, if we don’t understand those needs ourselves?

This session is NOT about software development; this session is about things we can do and tools we can use to organize ourselves, so we can free up our minds to more important things. Tools covered in this session include (but not limited to) Evernote, application launchers, screen capture tools, tablets, smartphones, etc.

Tulsa Tech Fest

Adventures of a .NET developer in Rails land

After several years of working almost exclusively with .NET, I started looking into Ruby on Rails; different language, framework, tools, mindset. In this session I go over the findings that were important to me, the main source of difficulties, what resources were helpful, the things I enjoyed the most, etc. Attendees to this session will learn what they need to know in order to get started developing Rails apps, or at least learn things that might help them approaching things in a different way when doing .NET development.

Software Development is a Joke!

Several of my technical presentations introduce some kind of humor, but sometimes people end up learning the joke and not the concept. So I decided to do a humor presentation based on software development, introduce some technical stuff, and see what I get!

After so many years writing software, I can’t help but laugh at so many (good and bad!) experiences myself and other developers have had. Not to mention things that just can’t make sense to normal people: how can this ?[A-Z0–9._%+-]+@[A-Z0–9.-]+.[A-Z]{2,4}$ be called a “regular” expression? (If you know by heart what that expression means, you are probably the kind of people who willl try to explain to me why zero-based arrays are kinda cool… please, just don’t!).

F-bombs may be dropped, but let’s be honest, you drop them yourself when it’s 5pm on Friday and that code insists not to work, don’t you?

Share your story!

Have your own funny or outrageous software developer story to share? Check out my post on Software Development is a Joke and leave a comment!

Leave a comment

Software Development is a Joke!

soft-dev-is-a-joke

Have you ever tried to explain zero-based arrays to a non-developer? Like why the program crashed because you were “off by one”? Well, if not, you should try it. When I did, I got a look on the person’s face that clearly said: “for somebody who is supposed to be good at logic, this zero-based array thing of yours does not make ANY sense!”. So now one of my favorite things to do is to watch another developer explain this topic to somebody. Cracks me up. 

Better yet: try showing and explaining a regular expression to the layman!

Several years ago I’ve joined a project where one of my tasks was to find out why some financial records were disappearing from the application. When I found out what the reason was, at first I was mad at somebody doing something so stupid, but then I had to laugh when I explained the issue to the boss.

Of course there’s also the maddening experiences, such as pulling your hairs off over something that doesn’t work, just to find out the reason for it was you forgetting to run that stupid data script.

Well, I’ve got my own share of funny and not so funny (but when told to somebody else ends up being funny!) stories, pet peeves, and such. So I’m working on putting together a different type of presentation. Here’s the 1st draft of my abstract:

 

Several of my technical presentations introduce some kind of humor, but sometimes people end up learning the joke and not the concept. So I decided to do a humor presentation based on software development, introduce some technical stuff, and see if I get the opposite result!

After so many years writing software, I can’t help but laugh at so many (good and bad!) experiences myself and other developers have had. Not to mention things that just can’t make sense to normal people: how can this ˆ[A-Z0-9._%+-]+@[A-Z0-9.-]+\.[A-Z]{2,4}$ be called a “regular” expression? (If you know by heart what that expression means, you are probably the kind of people who’ll try to explain to me why zero-based arrays are kinda cool…).

F-bombs may be dropped, but let’s be honest, you drop them yourself when it’s 5pm on Friday and that code insists not to work, don’t you?

 

So if you have your own stories or pet peeves to share, please send it my way; now, be aware that I may turn whatever you share into a comic bit of my presentation. Smile

You can post it as a comment here, or we can communicate through Skype or something. However works for you.

5 Comments

New posts on testing for the RubySource

In case you haven’t been following my posts for the RubySource, just a few days ago I published Part 1 and Part 2 on a small series about testing. Check it out!

Some of my other posts include:

If you’ve been following my blog and my adventures on Rails land and would like me to write about anything in specific, please let me know!

,

Leave a comment

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.