Improving my Reading System and Leveraging Obsidian

I’ve been working on building my book library and keeping up with my reading habits for years. My process for that has been evolving, and it’s one that I’m moving from Evernote to Obsidian.

My needs:

  • To keep track of what books I own (it has happened that I purchased a book I already owned);
  • To know the formats I own, such as printed, ebook, audiobook. Sometimes I’m listening to an audiobook and realize a printed copy would be better. Sometimes I finish reading a book and want to listen to it to revisit the content;
  • To know what books I’m reading, have read, or that are in my to-read list;
  • To know what books I’ve read in the current year, so I can put together my “Favorite Books I’ve Read in…” blog posts;
  • To know what books I’ve read more than once. Sometimes people ask me for my favorite books, and I want to give them a better informed answer, instead of just relying on what comes to mind first;
  • To know what books are the most recommended to me. It can be through a direct recommendation from friends or co-workers, or maybe through a recommendation found in a book or author I’m enjoying;
  • To find my own notes on the book

This post outlines how I’m now handling all of that. I’m always refining things, but this should describe the core pieces and the direction I’m going. At the bottom of this post you’ll find some resources I’ve used to learn how to put this together.

Tracking recommendations

When I get a book recommendation, I go to Obsidian and invoke the plugin to create a new book note:

The plugin has me type either the book’s name or ISBN. It shows me a list of what it found, I select the one I’m looking for, and complete the operation, which creates a note for me, like so:

I’ve split the window so we can see the markdown down created for the note on the left and the rendered version on the right.

That initial content comes from a template, which I got from the plugin and tweaked to my liking, including the following fields to the metadata you see at the top:

  • status: unread/reading/read
  • formats: ebook/paperback/audiobook
  • recommendations: names and/or places I got the recommendations from
  • finished: the dates when I finished reading the book

I then created a note that uses the Dataview plugin to query my notes and display the results:

The window is split to show the results on the left and the query on the right. Some non-public names are blurried.

The results let me answer the following question: what books have I not ready yet that has more than one recommendation?

Capturing my notes on a book

I take notes on books I’m reading. Whether it’s an ebook or printed book, I highlight passages and write on the book. If it’s an audiobook, I write notes using pen and paper (I actually use a reMarkable, but I’ll save that for another post).

Once I’m done with the book, I review my notes and highlights and consolidate them into that book note I created in Obsidian. My notes include quotes, images, links out to other notes or resources, my own thoughts, etc.

The image above shows my notes on a book on the left and the graph view on the right, which lets me see the connections I have associated with that book.

Tracking books I’ve read or am reading in a given year

As part of my annual review process, I’ve been looking over the books I’ve finished reading in that year and selecting my favorite ones. I put that list out as a blog post, such as this one for 2021. The following note helps me do such reflection:

Again, results on the left, query on the right.

The results include the years when I finished the book; it makes easy for me to see what books I’ve read more than once. Why? Two reasons:

  • When people ask me for book recommendations or my favorite books, I have a better informed answer (instead of just relying on memory);
  • When I see the years when I’ve read a given book, I can draw connections between that and other books or things I had going on around those times

At the bottom of that list (not shown in the capture above), I see a list of books I’m currently reading, which I use when I want to drop in and add a few notes even befor I’m done reading the book.

Listing all books

The simplest query I have is one that lists all books I’ve added:

On that list I can see:

  • All books
  • Their status, cover, and title
  • Recommendations
  • Formats. This one is interesting: if I see a book that’s “unread” and has any kind of format (e.g., ebook), that means I’ve already purchased the book but haven’t read it yet. Also, if I see one like that and it has no recommendations, it just means I’ve heard or seen the book somewhere and want to read it.

About Dataview queries

If you’ve been paying close attention to the queries I’ve shown, you may have noticed the use of two different types of syntax. The reason is the following: for the most simple queries (such as the one to list all books), I use the the standard dataview query; for the queries that need a little more tweaking, I use the dataview javascript API, which provides more granular access to the metadata I’ve added to the notes.

Resources

These are the resources I’ve used to learn how to put together the system outlined in this post.

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Gradually Complementing/Replacing Evernote with Obsidian

The first “personal information manager” I’ve used was Lotus Organizer in the mid 90s. Then there was Microsoft Schedule+, later replaced by Microsoft Outlook, which I stopped using as my personal tool in 2010 or so.

I had a Palm OS around 2000 which I used mostly for note taking. Then a Microsoft Pocket PC in 2003, I think, which I hoped it’d integrate with Microsoft OneNote, which I used for some time.

Then I got into Onfolio (which allowed downloading webpages, organizing them into collections, and building my own knowledge store). A nice little tool that vanished without further notice shortly after getting acquired.

Other than OneNote, all of those things disappeared in a matter of just a few years.

ALL
of them. In just a FEW years.

How can we trust technology when it goes out like that? But I digress…

In 2009, I heard of Evernote, when they were still in Beta. I gave it a try and have been using it since then. Being able to use the same tool seamlessly on a PC, Mac, iPhone, iPad: that’s what got me hooked immediately. I’ve put out many blog posts on how I’ve been using it.

I always keep an eye out for different ways to improve my process and systems. Up until 2020, I haven’t found any reason to replace Evernote with anything else. Compared to the options above, this tool has had a very long and stable run for me. Kudos to them.

Their first version was implemented in WPF, which they’ve learned wasn’t the best choice for their product, and so they rewrote the entire software from scratch after a while. As a consumer of their tool, I remember switching between the two versions going painlessly. As far as I remember, they reached feature parity quickly (at least for the features I used extensively at the time).

But then in 2020 comes another full rewrite: as I understand, they had a different codebase for each operating system they supported (PC, OS, iOS, Android…), which was very hard to keep up with (adding features, fixing bugs…). So this time they went with ElectronJS.

I got into the beta program to try out the new version. I use the tool all day long, on a PC, on a Mac, and on my iPhone. Within a month I had to go back to the previous version, not because of the expected stability issues of a beta version, but because of the large number of missing features I’ve been relying on for several years.

To mention a few of those features:

  • Lack of support for tabs. Here’s one of my use cases for it.
  • Lack of multi-window support (I can open notes in separate windows, but I can’t have multiple Evernote windows)

As someone who works with 3 computer screens most of the day, being able to use those screens effectively is a must, and a tool that doesn’t let me run multiple windows severely impacts that need.

Evernote “Legacy”: multiple windows and tabs

I’ve reported to them all of the use cases and reasons why I was falling back to their “legacy” version, at least on my Mac, which is where I use the tool the most. I’ve kept using the latest version on my PC so I could stay updated on their progress. As I saw their comments about which features we could be expecting soon, and the lack of information on most of the features I was interested in, I figured I should start looking for alternatives.

With so many people swearing by Notion, I looked into it. Didn’t like it.

At a Virtual Brown Bag earlier this year, I heard of Obsidian. It looked interesting, so I noted I should look into it. A few months later, I start hearing good things about it from people whose opinion I trust. So I decided to spend more time on it. I’m liking it.

I’m gradually learning more about the tool. It doesn’t seem to fit all of my use cases yet. But it does work really well for some of them.

For some things, I’ve either completely moved over or started to move parts of it. For example, keeping track of my book reading or how to decide what book to read next, and building and maintaining my book library. Also, keeping track of quotes that inspire me.

I’m not in a hurry. I’m not desparate to use the flashy new toy. And I do see me using the different tools for different parts of my system.

Obsidian has one of the same issues that the Electron-based version of Evernote does: lack of multi-screen support. The latest version added an option to open/move a note into a separate window, but it currently doesn’t work well on the PC and Mac. It seems fine when the windows are showing on the same screen, but it gets really funky when I move the new windows to another screen.

Obsidian: Multiple windows and panes on a single screen

Looking at where Evernote has been putting their effort for the last 2 years and the direction they’re going, and where Obsidian is going with their community plugins and all, I’ll keep working at my gradual transition between the two tools.

I’ll put out separate posts talking about specific use cases.

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May I ask a question?

This has become a personal mission: I want to help build environments where nobody starts a sentence with “may I ask a dumb question?

The group welcomes questions.
The group encourages questions.
People feel safe asking questions.

Questions are asked to:

  • clarify understanding
  • identify coaching and mentoring opportunities

But how do we build such environments?

Here are some ideas:

We may think we know something because “that’s how we’ve always done it”. Well, that’s not true. That might be how we’ve been doing it for a long time since we learned it.

But what if we learned it wrong?

Or what if we learned it right but eventually got sloppy and turned it into the way we’ve always done it?

That question from someone who doesn’t know something might be just what we need to challenge our assumptions, our biases, our beliefs that went into auto-pilot and never gotten updated.

Here’s something I’ve been pondering (by Marie-Christine Gasingirwa):

In life there isn’t a single person that knows everything and there is no person that knows nothing.

It’s not too late to learn because you just need to develop that interest, talk to people, share with them what you have and learn from them.

There is no breakthrough in this world if you are isolated, you can only make a breakthrough by talking to people.

 

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On Balancing Life

There’s a lot of talk about “Work-Life Balance”…

I think if there’s no life

There’s no work

Some are doing only work and nothing else…

Others might say “Dude, get a life!”

It’s not either/or. There’s life… and work is a part of it.

But we too often fill up life with work…

But there’s more to life than just work…

We can turn some knobs to adjust how we live life, as in “this week/month/quarter/year I’m doing more of this, less of that”

Turning those knobs can be something well-balanced and thought-out. But it can also be an abrupt change due to unforeseen events…

But everything changes, nothing stays the same, so we keep adjusting those dials again as time goes by…

Those areas of life don’t have to be isolated from each other; they can have some overlap!

It’s great to have some shared experiences, with the awareness to keep certain issues on the far edges…

These are some random thoughts and rough drawings I’ve been collecting and figured it might make sense to others out there.

The “knobs and dials” I mention in this post can be adjusted based on Core and Supporting Values.

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Deciding What Book to Read Next

A reading habit can be easily broken if we aren’t sure about what to read next. For many years, that hasn’t been an issue as I’ve been building my book library and there’s always something I can pick up. But how do I decide what to read next?

The easiest approach is to simply pick up a book I want to read and get started. Don’t overthink it. Just do it.

Next best approach is to pick something up that has been referred to me by people who have consistently been giving me good referrals.

Following that, if I’m enjoying a book that I’m reading and the author recommends other books, I add them to my “books wishlist” on Amazon.

When I hear one of my favorite authors have a new book out, I either get it or immediately add it to my wishlist.

Some books have been a referral from multiple sources; I indicate that on my wishlist. If a book has multiple referrals, I put it at the top of my list.

Back in my teenage years when I started reading fiction books in English, I had a practice of starting the next book immediately after finishing the previous one. Over the last several years I simply start reading books whenever I feel like. I don’t wait to finish one before starting another, which means that:

  • I read many books at the same
  • I’m always reading at least one book
  • Some books I finish quickly, others I may go on reading for as long as a few years

How do you decide what book to read next?

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Core and Supporting Values

Last week, I’ve asked if your values overlap with your employers’. As I mentioned, I looked at the list of values and found out my top 2, but I never said what they are. Here you go: legacy and making a difference. That’s what I call my core values. I’ve arrived at those by reflecting on my own life this far, revisiting the main highlights, interactions, and pivotal moments.

Several months after going through that process, I went back to the list to take another look at the other values I had also hightlighted: fairness, gratitude, humor, initiative, patience, personal fulfillment, responsibility, and spirituality. Those are what I call my supporting values.

What’s the distinction between core and supporting? When I look into my future, I hope my core values represent the life I’ve lived. As I look through my past, current moment, and the time between now and my future, I believe my supporting values will guide me to the future I want.

As time goes on, I turn the knobs on each one of those values, adjusting them to handle whatever situation I’m going through, and preparing me to move on to the next step in my journey. By being aware of my values I’m better able to set goals and processes to achieve them; whatever I come up with has to be directly related to one or more of those values.

So what does Improving have to do with any of that?

Improving’s guiding principles of Excellence, Involvement, and Dedication, our culture and Improvers provide me the inspiration, motivation, and environment to live into my values.

As I re-read James Clear’s Atomic Habits, I’ve run into these bits where he talks about how we “imitate the close”:

We soak up the qualities and practices of those around us.

Improvers’ qualities and practices have caught my attention when I first met a few of these folks back in 2007. After all these years living in this culture, Clear’s words resonate with me deeply:

One of the most effective things you can do to build better habits is to join a culture where your desired behavior is the normal behavior. New habits seem achievable when you see others doing them every day.

It doesn’t end there:

Your culture sets your expectation for what is “normal”. Surround yourself with people who have the habits you want to have yourself. You’ll rise together.

I’d like to add something to that: in my case, I already had habits that I considered good, and I’ve been able to not only keep those habits but also help others build those habits themselves. Oftentimes, it’s very hard to keep good habits when you’re surrounded by individuals whose habits are the polar opposite of ours.

To wrap up this pair of posts with actionable tips straight off of Clear’s book:

Join a culture where (1) your desired behavior is the normal behavior and (2) you already have something in common with the group.

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Do your values overlap with your employer’s?

Not happy with your job? Find an employer whose values align with your own.

Are you clear on what your values are? I had clues about my own, but it wasn’t until last year when I narrowed them down. How? By actively participating in a book club with my co-workers (something encouraged by Improving’s values).

We covered Brene Brown’s Dare to Lead. In a certain section of the book, there’s an activity for the readers to identify their values. It presents a long list of common values. We’re supposed to identify the top 2. Not easy, so we may start with our top 10, and then narrow it down. I found mine. I call the top 2 my core values, and the remaining 8 my supporting values. As I look at Improving’s values and philosophy, I see how the company makes it easy for me to live my own values.

Here are a few practical examples:

  • I’m an avid book reader. Having great people to have conversations about the content enhances the experience a lot. We put the word out in our internal technical communities, and book clubs are formed.
  • I identify a need for a space where I can gather motorcycle track riders who want to discuss their experiences, analyze their learnings, share their tips. I create the community and I get the space at Improving to have our meetings.
  • My co-workers show interest in the practices I have to organize life, set and execute goals, pick up hobbies, learn languages. I put together my notes, create classes, and offer them as internal training. Many people join in, we deepen our relationships and have a great time.
  • I’ve been practicing meditation, financial health, physical activities. Improving comes up with an internal, year-long initiative focusing the month of January on wellness. Tons of people join in, experiences are shared, good times are had, great results are achieved.

I could keep going on and on. In fact, the subject comes up in my mourning journalling very frequently. Sometimes, I make those words surface in this blog. Other times, I keep them to myself, as I introspect and look for ways to increase and/or leverage the overlap there is between my values and Improving’s.

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Pragmatic Programmers – Philosophy and Approach

One of the book clubs I’ve joined last year with my fellow Improvers was on “The Pragmatic Programmer – Your Journey to Mastery – 20th Anniversary Edition”. I remember reading the 1st edition sometime around 2006 and am glad I reviewed its newer edition.

Here are some notes wrote down…

“You shouldn’t be wedded to any particular technology, but have a broad enough background and experience base to allow you to choose good solutions in particular situations.”

That! I have (bad) memories of wasting a lot of time because a particular tech stack was chose for no reason other than a marriage to a particular vendor, despite of it not offering the best technology to achieve the client’s goals.

Care about your craft: there is no point in developing software unless you care about doing it well.

I wouldn’t trust surgeons who don’t care about doing their craft well. Would you?

“Over the long term, your time investment will be rapid as you and your team become more efficient, write code that’s easier to maintain, and spend less time in meetings

I love the point above. I enjoy doing code review with team members so we can learn from each other. I’ve worked on teams where at some point we couldn’t tell which one of us wrote the code, because we’ve learned to value the same best practices, which we kept in mind in our daily work. Whenever someone learned something new, they’d share with the team, and we’d evolve together.

“We who cut mere stones must always be enviosioning cathedrals”

YES! Developers shouldn’t be content with dropping a button onto a form that when clicked shows whatever message; they should see through it and understand the bigger context.

If technology seems to be passing you by, make time (in your own time) to study new stuff that looks interesting. You’re investing in yourself, so doing it while you’re off-the-clock is only reasonable.

That’s precisely what I’ve been doing for a very long time. The main difference is that I started to apply that not only to technology, but also to many other areas of life. What I’ve done off-the-clock has always been the biggest driving force behind my continous improvement.

Above all, your team needs to be able to trust and rely on you – and you need to be comfortable relying on each of them as well. Trust in a team is absolutely essential for creativity and collaboration. In a healthy environment based in trust, you can safely speak your mind, present your ideas, and rely on your team members who can in turn rely on you. Without trust, well…

If you ever visit Improving.com, you’ll immediately see the following words: “Trust Changes Everything”. As I look back on my professional career, I can point out several opportunities and growth that came out of being trusted by people from all walks of life. A team without trust isn’t much of a team.

Pushing that concept a little further, I like a point raised by the authors of “Yes, And: How Improvisation Reverses ’No, But’ Thinking and Improves Creativity and Collaboration — Lessons from The Second City” (another book club we had last year!) The point they raised is to go from team to ensemble, which is an even more collaborative relationship. In Improv, it’s very easy for one to become very uncomfortable, but a strong ensemble is there to support each other when ramping up skills or going through an off night.

Don’t live with broken windows. Hopelessness can be contagious.

That one makes me think of teams that abandon their automated tests because they have become brittle, hard to maintain, hard to write, hard to fix when they start to fail.

Be a catalyst for change

Nobody else writes tests? You should do it, regardless. Nobody else writes clean code? You do it! Nobody else says “thank you” anymore? You do it. Thank you.

There were many other great things in this book and I strongly recommend it to anyone who’s anywhere near software development. Most of the lessons taught have stood the test of time, and the ones that didn’t (due changes in technology and such) were revised and updated in this 20th Anniversary Edition.

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My Favorite Quotes in 2021

I’ve just reviewed my favorite quotes in 2020, which gave me some ideas for potential blog posts. But for this post, here are my favorite quotes collected in 2021. These are quotes that made me write them up on my whiteboard, reflect, journal, introspect. Hopefully you’ll find one or two that’ll have the same effect on you!

“The best ideas are the honest ones. Ones born out of personal experience. Ones that originated to help a few and ended up helping many.” – Simon Sinek

“Continuous improvement is better than delayed perfection.” – Mark Twain

“Associate with people who are likely to improve you. Welcome those who you are capable of improving. The process is a mutual one: men learn as they teach.” – Seneca

“Instead of getting angry at other people’s poor execution, focus on the deficiencies in your instruction. Instead of resenting their protest, examine whether you’ve been persuasive enough. Don’t get mad about red tape—think about all the bad ideas this process actually has helped stop. Be forgiving of other people’s stupidity or rudeness—because you’ve been plenty guilty of it yourself at one time or another.” – Daily Stoic

“People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” – Maya Angelou

“Your mind will take the shape of what you frequently hold in thought, for the human spirit is colored by such impressions.” – Marcus Aurelius

“One of the greatest discoveries a person makes is to find they can do what they were afraid they couldn’t do.” – Henry Ford

“Creativity is intelligence having fun.” – Albert Einstein

“Happy is the person who can improve others, not only when present, but even when in their thoughts!” – Seneca

“Our worth is measured by what we devote our energy to.” – Marcus Aurelius

“No person has the power to have everything they want, but it is in their power not to want what they don’t have, and to cheerfully put to good use what they do have.” – Seneca

“Though you cannot go back and start again, you can start from now and have a brand new end.” – Unknown

“An amateur practices until they can play it correctly, a professional practices until they can’t play it incorrectly.” – Unknown

“A writer—and, I believe, generally all persons—must think that whatever happens to him or her is a resource. All things have been given to us for a purpose, and an artist must feel this more intensely. All that happens to us, including our humiliations, our misfortunes, our embarrassments, all is given to us as raw material, as clay, so that we may shape our art.” – Jorge Luis Borges

“I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.” – Bruce Lee

“Most geniuses—especially those who lead others—prosper not by deconstructing intricate complexities but by exploiting unrecognized simplicities.” – Andy Benoit

“Nothing but opinion is the cause of a troubled mind” – Epictetus

“A virtuous person does not jump to hasty judgments about other people. A virtuous person is generous with assumptions.” – Daily Stoic

“The world will ask you who you are, and if you do not know, the world will tell you.” – Carl Jung

“Reading after a certain age diverts the mind too much from its creative pursuits. Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking, just as the man who spends too much time in the theater is tempted to be content with living vicariously instead of living his own life.” – Albert Einstein

“Where you are is a result of who you were, but where you go depends entirely on who you choose to be.” – Hal Elrod

“You may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing that we call “failure” is not the falling down, but the staying down.” – Mary Pickford

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Favorite Books I’ve Read in 2021

Here are some of my favorites books read in 2021, in no particular order.

Unshakable

I had been planning to review my approach to personal finances and this book helped me quite a bit with that, validating some of the things I’ve been doing for decades, as well as teaching me things I had no clue about and making act on it.

The Art of Mentoring

This was a re-read. I’ve first read this book in 2004 and decided to pick it up again. I’ve enjoyed it as much as the first time through. I really like books that teaches things as a novel (some of my favorites include The Goal, The Phoenix Project, The Unicorn Project).

The Artist’s Way

This book was first recommended to me back in 2016. For years, I kept seeing it recommended by many people whose opinion I value. I finally decided to pick it up and read it, and I’m glad I did it. I’ve gotten a lot out of it, as it helped me improve my journalling, finish lyrics for new original songs, practice my creativity in many aspects, organize and add more clarity to my thoughts, validate my thoughts about hobbies, just to name a few things. It’s the kind of book from which the lessons learn will stick around with me for a long, long time.

The Pragmatic Programmer

I remember reading the first edition of The Pragmatic Programmer in the mid 2000s. I thoroughly enjoyed reading its 20th Anniversary edition with other Improvers in a book club. It was great seeing how many things I’ve learned from that book have stuck with me after all these years. I’m yet to create my “must-read list” for software developers, but this book is very likely to be included.

How to Lead when you’re Not in Charge

This was a book that I had to work hard to read through the author’s style and get what I needed out of the content. While the book was “ok”, it inspired me to write one of my favorite posts last year, as well as it made the core message stuck in my mind: “lead through influence, not through authority”.

Yes, And

After taking classes on Improv and leading some Improv sessions at Improving (I’ve talked about some of those experiences), it was great to have a book club dedicated to this book.

How to Live

One of my favorite books in 2020 was Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives, which I heard about through Derek Sivers (the author of two of my favorite books in 2020!). In 2021 he published his own book inspired by the style he learned from “Sum”, and it’s such a great book. When Derek asked his readers to write a review, this is what I sent him:

As I was reading this book, I kept highlighting sentences and paragraphs on it. At times, I noticed I highlighted almost entire chapters! Besides writing my own notes on the pages.

Derek’s skills to boil important thoughts down into something that grabs my attention is insane. It has been only 2 months or so since I’ve read the book, and I’m planning on reading it again very soon, setting aside time for self-reflection.

The year isn’t over yet, but this is already among my favorite books in 2021!

Now that 2021 is over, I can confirm this was one of my favorite books, and I have started reading it again pretty much on January 1st.

Implementing Domain-Driven Design

This one was also part of a book club at Improving. This is a dense book, and it took us 4 months to go through it. The group decided to revisit certain chapters, add meetings after we were done discuss some topics again, and we closed it with a round of lightning talks offered to our internal AppDev community, with the book club members sharing their main takeaways from the book.

It had been a long time since I’ve read Eric Evans’ seminal book on DDD, and it was great to revisit the topic. It was interesting to see some things that I didn’t quite grok when I first read that book but ended up learning through other means over the years.

Rainbow in the Dark

Ronnie James Dio is one of my all-time favorite singers. I’ve listened to his music (Rainbow, Black Sabbath, Dio) since I was a kid, and I continue listening to it with the same level of enjoyment. I’ve picked up this auto-biography to read as soon as it came out.

Fifty Quick Ideas to Improve your User Stories

I have been blogging about user stories, as well as giving talks on the subject and leading a few workshops. This topic has been hot for for several years now. This book validated some of the ideas I’ve been trying out over the years and it also gave me some new ones. Highly recommended! Developers, take a moment to put down that book on JavaScript, C#, (name your language of choice), and read this one instead.

Intro to EventStorming

This book came in handy as I work in a project that includes DDD, CQRS, and Event Sourcing.

Even though I’ve read many books published by LeanPub in the past, this is the first time I have actually read one that isn’t fully finished yet. I enjoyed the experience: many chapters are missing big chunks, but still, I’ve learned enough to enable me to run some EventStorming sessions and get great value from it. This book was also a great compliment to the DDD and the User Stories books mentioned above.

Badass: Making Users Awesome

If you’ve been following my blog, you might remember that this book was featured in my favorite books read in 2020. And here it is again. Yes, it is that good for me.

Since I’ve read it I’ve been putting lessons learned into practice with great success! So much so that I wanted to read it again, and figured I should drag Improvers with me, so I’ve led a book club. The conversations were great, and we’re just about to have a round of lightning talks to share our takeaways with our internal community.

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